City Life

March has been a crazy month – after leaving our cushy mountain cabin, we immediately headed out into the desert. But, all along, we were pushing toward three days in Yuma, where we planned to meet up with Caite and Glenn, Texas full-timers we had met in Austin a few years ago, and with whom we have kept in touch (blogs make that so easy…). It was great to catch up with them, trade camping stories, and see their brand-new, deluxe truck camper. Oh yeah, I have camper envy – Big Time! They have a great system going.

Yuma is big! Been a long time since we’ve been in a town of nearly 100,000 with all the retail, traffic, and noise that goes along with size. There are acres of RV parks, mostly ‘age-restricted’, which means you have to be 55+ to stay there. Although activities and events abound, I don’t think this would be my first choice of locations – not much hiking, and cycling was tough, due to traffic, and lack of bike lanes. Nevertheless, we had a great time.

Yuma Territorial Prison State Park is one of the premier attractions in the area. We cycled over there – about 25 miles round trip. That was an experience in itself, as Google maps tried to send us down several roads that didn’t exist. We wound up passing through farmlands on dirt roads, primarily used for trucks and tractors. So happy to have our sturdy mountain bikes! Check out this photo from a lettuce farm. There’s a lesson here.20170309_135456.jpgThere are eight tightly packed rows of lettuce separated by a gap on each side. In this photo, there’s a curly green on the left and a dark red on the right. I think this is so that they can harvest the entire eight rows, and that’s your mixed salad bag in the grocery store. I had always assumed that they were grown separately, harvested, and mixed, but seeing the fields has changed my minds on this. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but there’s a definite separation every eight rows. Grow, harvest, wash, bag. Direct to table – no mixing necessary. Genius!

The Territorial Prison was interesting – built in the 1870s, it held nearly over 3000 prisoners (30 of whom were women) until it was closed around 1910. Grim stone cells with iron bars and bunks still stand. It’s amazing that a prison of such size could be supported in the desert all those years. Basically everything used in the prison was made there, and supplies came in via the Colorado River which runs alongside, or by rail. In any case, it was a harsh existence. It was hard to get any decent photos – the bright, harsh sunlight was not my friend. One of the standout features was the guard tower, which was built over the water well, to help prevent evaporation. wp-1489092737493.jpgHere are a few other photos. It was grim.

We tried to wash away the prison taste with a beer at Prison Hill Brewing Company. Happy to report, that was a successful endevour. I was intrigued by their vodka, but wisely refrained from a sample, due to the hot 15 mile ride back to camp.wp-1489092726291.jpgWe did manage one excruciatingly difficult hike in Yuma. Telegraph Hill is the name of the ‘hill’ where all the electronic towers are located. Glenn said it was an “aggressive walk”. OMG! I’ve never been on a steeper road in my life. Here’s the view looking down.wp-1489376836146.jpg The first mile of dirt trail rose a few hundred feet – no big deal. The second mile added about 1000′ of additional altitude, up a busted semi-paved road. It was ridiculous, but the view at the top amazing.wp-1489376850382.jpg We wished that we had started a few hours earlier so that we would have been done before the day really heated up – no shade for the Crankshaws! We roasted.

We were than ready to head toward Coastal California, with its promises of ocean breeze after a few days in Yuma.wp-1489373282778.jpg We love Sweetwater Regional Park, where we’re currently camped. Green grass, shade, and cooler more humid air all seems very welcome. After our last visit a few years ago, we kicked ourselves for not touring the USS Midway Museum, a mothballed WWII-era aircraft carrier which is a permanent museum in San Diego harbor. It’s BIG!wp-1489378194375.jpg The flight deck has planes of all types, including an F-14, helicopters of all varieties, and various other warplanes.20170312_194447.jpg It was quite a contrast to the tiny two-seater open cockpit fighter planes down below which actually were used at the Battle of Midway. The USS Midway, named after the Battle, although it was not a participant, was active from 1945 to 1992 – making it the longest-serving aircraft carrier of the 20th century.

I was overwhelmed by the scale and power of war machines. Bombs and torpedos are stacked up everywhere. The Greatest Generation gave everything unquestioningly to the war effort, and there are tens of thousands of heroes. Many vets are volunteers here. At any given time, they are making presentations about aspects of Navy life in WWII and specifically aboard an aircraft carrier. But, I’m done with war museums. They are interesting to see, but depressing as hell. I need to visit a Peace Museum, but I don’t think there are any. Here are a few photos of areas that caught my eye.wp-1489373301193.jpgwp-1489373124090.jpg20170312_194401.jpg20170312_194059.jpgwp-1489372648950.jpg

Another hot hike today in very hot, humid conditions. John and Jezzy turned back about halfway up, as the heat and unrelenting sun were just too much for Jezzy. We should have left her home. I pressed on to Rocky Point, and was rewarded with the flag at the top, and a few great views.wp-1489373240443.jpg Most of the area was covered with a thick blanket of humidity/smog, which made it a challenge to get any photos. It took several hours this morning for the fog to burn off enough for us to venture out on our hike.wp-1489373259766.jpgMonday is our last day here, and we plan to cycle into San Diego again, and take the ferry to Coronado Island to explore a bit. Cycling here is a blast – trails and bike lanes are everywhere. We’re happy not to have to drive/park in the Big City. We’re much better off on two wheels

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